Friday, August 17, 2018

Perceptive Chosen as Fastest Growing in SC!


Perceptive Recruiting has been named one of the 40 fastest-growing companies in South Carolina for 2018 by SC Biz News!

Twenty large companies and 20 small companies have been named to the statewide Roaring Twenties list presented annually by SC Biz News. This honor recognizes the state’s fastest-growing companies based on both dollar and percentage increases in revenue from 2016-2017.

In order to qualify for the Roaring Twenties designation, companies must have a physical presence in South Carolina and be a for-profit entity or a nonprofit organization (EXCEPT FOR: government entities and charitable organizations, including 501(c)3 organizations.  These types of nonprofits are not eligible).

Company size was determined by gross revenue: A small company was considered as having $10 million and under in revenue. Large companies were classified as having over $10 million in revenue. Small companies must have had revenues of at least $500,000 each year for the years 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Profiles of the winning companies will be published in the winter issue of SCBIZ magazine. The winners will be honored at an event on Oct. 25 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Columbia.



Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Six Benefits of Using a Recruitment Agency

Hiring a new employee is a time consuming yet a vitally important process. We take a look at some of the true benefits of using a trusted recruitment partner in the search for new employees.

BENEFIT #1: TIME SAVED

In business, time is money and using a Recruitment Agency is a time saver. They will save you time because they take care of the beginning steps of the hiring process. If you post a job opening on traditional job boards, there is a strong chance you will receive hundreds of resumes and applications for any single position. Out of the hundreds of applicants, a significant amount will not be qualified or will simply not be right for the job. Finding the right applicants to interview will take a great amount of time and effort.

BENEFIT #2: ACCESS TO THE BEST

In addition to sorting through submitted applications, a Recruitment Agency will also have access to the best talent available. This includes access to talent that is currently employed elsewhere. These qualified individuals can work discreetly with a recruitment agency when they are looking for a new challenge and opportunity. Recruitment Agencies have their own database of qualified applicants that they can pull directly from.

BENEFIT #3: COST

It is often assumed that bringing recruitment in-house will result in a saving of cost to the business. Cost needs to proportioned to advertising your vacancy, which can prove expensive if posting single one-off jobs. Recruitment Agencies will often have allocations on the all the top job boards, so you can ensure that your job is advertised in all the correct places. Administrative costs also need to be taken in consideration of facilitating the process, sifting through the CVs, initial conversations, the list goes on – these all take time, and as we all know time is money. A Recruitment Agency is also there to help negotiate the best salary, giving you guidance and advice on what is fair and appropriate, but also what you might need to do to guarantee that top candidate that everyone else is after too!

BENEFIT #4: THE SCREENING PROCESS

The screening process when hiring has several layers. You need to run background checks on potential employees, follow up with references and conduct preliminary interviews to make sure the candidate matches the promises they make on their resumes. Again, these are vital steps that just take up time when you are conducting them on your own. A Recruitment Agency will see to it that these steps are taken care of before you meet anyone for your own interviews. You will feel assured that anyone you meet has already passed these tests.

BENEFIT #5: PEACE OF MIND

A good Recruitment Agency is going to have a proven track record of finding the right employees for the job. When you meet with their narrowed down choices, you can feel more confident with your final hiring decision. Working with a Recruitment Agency will help you make a more assured decision.

BENEFIT #6: RELATIONSHIP

Once you have developed a relationship with a Recruitment Agency that you trust, your future hirings will go even more smoothly. The Agency will be aware of the qualities that it takes to make the right fit within your company and what you expect from them. The next time you have an available position, you can fill it quickly and satisfactorily.
Article compliments of BlueSkies.

Monday, July 16, 2018

How to use time in between jobs effectively


By Eric Titner

For most people, filling the time in between jobs can be a real challenge. We want to make sure that we’re using this time to our advantage, but figuring out how to do so effectively — especially if it’s a longer time period than we’d like it to be — can be difficult. It’s really in your best interest to try to structure and make the most of this down time, both for your long-term health and happiness as well as to help set you up for your next job.

Build and maintain your network

In today’s job market, cold calling and responding to general job ads is far less effective than it used to be. These days, a significant percentage of new jobs are obtained by leveraging your network, which includes your personal and professional contacts. Building and maintaining your contacts is an invaluable use of your time, and who knows — it may not be long before one of your 
connections comes up with a job opening that perfectly fits what you need and can offer.

Look for contract/ freelance work

Just because you’re be tween full-time jobs doesn’t mean your time has to be completely work free. Many companies utilize contract and freelance staff for a wide range of projects.

Consider seeking out opportunities in your field or in an area that fits your background and skill set; not only will it provide you with some income, it will also help fill in any lengthy time gaps on your resume.

Plus, if you do a particularly good job on a project, you might be considered for a longer-term position when one becomes available.

Take a class

Keep your mind and skills sharp by continuing your education.

You can pursue a subject in your professional field — which may help you during your job hunt — or you can take a class in a completely unrelated subject area that interests you. Either way, your time will be well spent.

Volunteer

Another good use of your time and energy in between jobs is to volunteer. Not only will you be helping to support a worthy cause, you’ll also be keeping active and could even acquire some new skills. You may even discover some completely new interests, which may help reshape your! career aspirations.

Create a backup plan

If things just don’t seem to be going your way and the amount of time that you’re unemployed is becoming a problem, then you may need to invest some time in coming up with a backup plan.
Take some time to research alternate fields that interest you, industries where your existing background and skills may be easily transferable, and jobs that seem hot right now and have an abundance of openings. It may turn out that your backup plan pans out and leaves you happier and more fulfilled than your previous goals.

Just because you’re in between jobs doesn’t mean that your time can’t be well spent. Use the strategies and advice presented here to make sure you’re using this time to your advantage.

Eric Titner has been an editor and content creator for more! than a decade. His primary professional focus has been on education- and career-related topics. He currently lives in New York City.

Monday, June 25, 2018

How long should you stay at a job you hate?


Everyone goes into a new job with a sense of optimism. New place, new coworkers, new responsibilities — what’s not to be optimistic about? After that initial buzz, however, you suddenly realize: I hate my job. It’s rarely in your interest to quit on the spot when you have that revelation, so how long should you stay? Let’s look at a few of different scenarios:

When seriously bad things are happening.
If you’ve discovered that there are illegal or harmful things going on at work, or your work is causing you serious physical issues, then you should definitely consider getting out now. It’s a safety issue.

When you hate your boss, and your work is starting to suffer.

If your work is making you miserable and you just can’t seem to get along with your boss, then it’s time to start thinking hard about your exit strategy.

But if you can hold on for a few weeks or months while you start putting out feelers about a new job, then you should delay handing in that resignation letter.

When you’re bored or mildly unhappy.

If your job isn’t challenging you like it should or you have a general diagnosis of Over It-itis, then definitely start thinking about your next steps. Don’t quit just yet.! Because this isn’t an emergency, you have time to do some soul searching about why you’re unhappy at work and what you can do to fix that. You may find that adjusting your workload or taking on different projects could make you happier and more fulfilled.

Before you quit, talk with your boss (without issuing any ultimatums) and let him know you’re interested in taking on more opportunities, or changing up your role. If he’s receptive, then give these new responsibilities a try. If he’s not, or you’ve tried out this new regime and you’re still unhappy, then step up your efforts to find another job before you quit this one. Remember that fairly or not, it’s almost always easier to find a job while you already have one.

Here’s what you need to consider before you quit, under an! y of these scenarios:

What is my financial situation? Do I have enough savings to cover a potentially months-long job search?

Do I have some good potential job leads lined up, or an interim plan (like freelancing or consulting)?

Are there any skills I will need to build before I try to get a comparable job (or a step-up job)?

Is there anything that I could do or ask of my boss that would make my job bearable again?

It’s best to have a plan here; the last thing you want to do is quit your job in a huff, and then realize that you’ve made a mistake. Sometimes leaving is the right thing to do, and quitting ! can push you to move your career forward. But if you take that step before you’re ready, you could be opening yourself up to a period of stress and career upheaval unnecessarily.

Kate Lopaze is a career advice journalist for TheJobNetwork.com where this article was originally published. She investigates and writes about current strategies, tips and trending topics related to all stages of one’s career.


Monday, June 4, 2018

The best way to answer, ‘Why should I hire you?’

BY ERIC TITNER
THEJOBNETWORK.COM

It’s the moment of truth: You’re on the job hunt, have landed an interview and it’s going well. You’re making a great impression on the person you’re meeting with, and it really feels as if you have this locked up. Then all of a sudden, you’re hit with the big question: "Why should I hire you?"

On its face, it may seem like an easy question, but that can be deceptive. There’s a lot riding on your answer (namely a new job), and the way in which you answer the question may reveal a great deal to the person who’s making the hiring decision.

Don’t worry — there are some effective strategies for how to handle this question that can help turn a good interview into a great one, ensure that you leave a positive, lasting impression on the interviewer and increase your chances of getting hired. The Balance, a personal finance website, published an article highlighting proven strategies for handling the, "Why should I hire you?" question. Consider taking advantage of the following tips: Build your pitch

Your answer to the question should reflect a deep awareness of the requirements of the position that you’re interviewing for, the needs of the company and the personality traits, skills and experience that make you an ideal candidate.

This means that you should always do your homework before getting to the interview, and you should be ready to confidently connect the dots between you, the employer and their needs. It never hurts to take a look at the keywords in the job posting and incorporate some of them into your answer. Still, you should always be ready to tweak your answer to reflect any new information you get during the interview.

Keep it brief

A good answer to the question should not be an endless soliloquy. Keep it short, simple and to the point.

Your one goal is to succinctly encapsulate why you bridge the gap between the position you’re vying for and the needs of the company.

Think a minute or two, tops.

Anything longer may exhaust the listener.

What makes you stand out?

It’s always smart to keep in mind that for every good answer you have for every interview question that arises, there’ll be a pack of other qualified candidates who are prepared with good answers, too. Make sure your response separates you from the crowd. Anything that makes you unique and could be viewed as a potential check mark in the "pro" column when hiring personnel are deciding about you is fair game.

Perhaps the interviewer mentioned that the company is seeking to expand its business internationally and you speak the language of a country that they may be looking to do business in — that could be a potential game changer.

Try to have your own game changer in mind when facing this question. Not only will you seem well-suited for the job, but it will also show that you’ve done your homework and know what the company is all about.

"Why should I hire you?" is a question that has the potential to leave you rambling while not saying much of anything.

Don’t waste your opportunity to create a powerful, pointed answer. Your interviewer will be impressed with your ability to summarize all you have to offer in a focused soundbite — you’ll look prepared, confident and responsible, all traits that are key to getting the job.

Eric Titner has been an editor and content creator for more than a decade. His primary professional focus has been on education- and career-related topics. He currently lives in New York City.


Monday, April 30, 2018

Candidate Q&A - Can I refuse to share my personal information?

Question: We are a small company. The owners want us to include personal information on their social media pages and be part of a monthly newsletter to clients. For example, information about what we’ve been doing with our families or favorite recipes. This makes me uncomfortable, as I want to keep my personal and professional lives separate. The owners are making this mandatory. Can I say no? — Michele L.

A: Yes, you can say no. But let me suggest another approach that involves conversation and compromise.  How about asking the owners to talk more about what they hope to accomplish by sharing such information?

Many businesses are eager to take advantage of the personal engagement that can be developed through social media or newsletters. However, sometimes they haven’t thought about the risks associated with putting such information out there.  Listen to their thoughts about why and how they want to use the information. Then share your concerns.

You might mention that publishing employee photographs or personal family information could potentially expose an employee or her family to security risks. Remind them that once photos and info are public, the company has little control over where they may end up.

You could suggest your company prepare an employee authorization/release to help owners understand they really should get your permission before sharing any personal information.
Now comes the compromise part. If your employer insists all employees participate, consider a middle ground. You could agree to post a favorite recipe, a photo of the family pet or other information that has less risk of revealing personal information than your picture.This could help your company meet its digital engagement goals and still keep most of your personal business offline.

Q: A recruiter requested that we FaceTime or Google Hangout as part of the interview process. This request made me uncomfortable. I pushed to meet in person, but the recruiter opted for a phone call. It didn’t go well. I feel the use of video is a way to potentially discriminate. (I’m in my 50s and African-American.) When I declined the video chat, it seemed as if the recruiter felt I was hiding something. What do you think about video interviews? Should I have said yes? — David L.

A: If you are unfamiliar with a new technology, it is understandable that it may feel uncomfortable, especially in the high-stakes context of a job search. But inevitably, the hiring process will reveal the candidate’s gender, race and age, so video interviewing doesn’t really present a significant additional risk.

Video interviewing is a growing technology used by employers in recruiting and hiring, and it is not going away. Not only can video help job seekers make a connection with a company earlier in the process without the added expense and disruption of an on-site interview, it allows recruiters to interview more candidates face to face earlier in the process.

Don’t let your discomfort with the technology be a barrier to using it. The secret to successful video interviewing is practice.  Try out different systems and setups. Watch how-to videos on YouTube for guidance on lighting and camera angle. Get comfortable chatting with friends on free video platforms such as Zoom and Skype.

Johnny C. Taylor Jr., a human-resources expert, is tackling your questions as part of a series for USA TODAY. Taylor is president and CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

9 things young job seekers say that wanna make me scream!

Just came across this fantastic, biting piece from Ted Williams of CharlotteAgenda:

Recently, I’ve been talking to more and more college students and recent graduates looking for jobs in advertising, marketing, media and communications. When I give job search advice, they look at me like I’ve got three eyes. Ugh.

Somebody is giving creative students awful job seeking advice. It’s likely somebody who’s never actually hired a young creative.
The stuff I hear from creative students drives me insane.
It makes me so mad that I want to join a university and develop programs that spit out highly employable, skill-rich graduates ready to dominate — instead of deer-in-headlight creatives unprepared and $120,000 poorer.

If you’re a creative employer, please join me in trying to rid these 9 things that young creative job seekers say.

Keep in mind that these thoughts are only for 20-something job seekers looking for creative careers. It’s different for people beginning careers in industries like finance and engineering, which have much more established career tracks.
uptown skyline sunset from wework

“I just applied for the social media manager position on the website, but I haven’t heard anything back. Weird, right?”

If a creative job has been posted online, you’re too late.
Job postings on creative roles from companies you’ve heard of receive anywhere from 300-500 applicants on average. If you’re just randomly sending your resume into an online job posting, you’re screwed. Stop it.

“I’m definitely not interested in a sales role, I’m looking for something in digital strategy.”

If you think sales is just for Michael Scott types, you’re wrong.
If you can’t sell, you’re limiting your creative career. Go sell something.
Some of the best experience you can get as a young person is software sales. Look at growing software startups like Passport, MapAnything and AvidXchange.

“There are no open job postings, so I didn’t reach out.”

Creative companies are ALWAYS hiring smart people that can solve problems.
Hiring you just isn’t that expensive. You likely cost between $30k-$50k. That’s just not material to most employers IF they’ve got a shot at landing their next superstar employee.
If a company has under 200 employees, go directly to the owner/CEO and tell them how you’re going to solve their problems and grow their business. “But that’s hard to do,” you say. Exactly.

“I don’t want to meet with the CEO and pitch ideas on how I’d grow her business.”

Let me guess, you want to grab coffee and “pick her brain on the industry.”
It’s exhausting for a creative leader to spend 60 minutes in small talk at the Starbucks on East Blvd in a brain picking session — all the time knowing that you’re just thinking, “Can you hand me a perfect job without me doing anything?”
Don’t put them through this torture. Don’t take, give. Add value by pitching solutions to the CEO’s problems.

“I’m not looking for a freelance, contract or internship position — I’m only looking for a full-time job.”

And I’m looking to only fly private.
Whether you like it or not, without a track record, many top tier employers will test you with project work. Always get paid (don’t do unpaid stuff), but take it seriously — creative leaders are always watching everything.

“I think my resume is perfectly polished”

Oh cool, you have your 3.5 GPA, college involvement and industry-specific internship showcased on your resume. Guess what? So does EVERYBODY.
The best way to get hired is to have a reputation, not a resume. And the best way to develop a reputation as a young person is to go launch stuff.
There’s just no excuse for creatives who haven’t brought an idea to market. Go launch an Instagram handle dedicated to local fashion and grow it to 10,000 followers. Go run an ad campaign for your favorite pizza joint that drove 50 customers on a Monday night. Go shoot 15-second Facebook food videos that never get under 5,000 views on Facebook. Go sell social media services to 5 small businesses.

“Haha, no I didn’t put Snapchat on my resume, but of course I know how to snap.”

But let me guess, you put “Proficient in Microsoft Office” on the bottom of your resume?
Keep in mind, you’re a subject matter experience on how communication works in the 18-25 demo. Act like one. It’s valuable.

“I don’t want to keep reaching out with good ideas because I’m scared of being annoying.”

Deleting emails is easy. It’s really not annoying. Management at creative companies and high-growth startups probably delete 200 emails each day from somebody pitching something.
“I’m not interested in this candidate because they send too many good ideas and they’re too ambitious,” said no employer, ever.
Be persistent.

“I’m just really eager to learn.”

Wait, that’s your pitch?
Your pitch is that you want an employer to pay you so that you can learn from them? I give up.